How to batch re size photos for a full High Definition Audio Visual

 

by Mark Allen, Bangor and North Down Camera Club.  A printable PDF version of this tutorial is available here.

First of all let's be clear about 'Full High Definition' means. It relates to the ration of 16:9 and for TV's and computer monitors this means 1920 pixels wide by 1080 pixels tall, known as 1920x1080. Please note that most cameras take images at 4:3 ratio. Full HD is 16:9. However many folk use 16:10, or 1920x1200. As many cameras capture images at around 4,000x 3000 pixels, why resize your images to 1920, which is clearly less than half the size of captured image? Therefore, in order to future proof your AV's, resizing to 3840x2400 may be a good investment.

This tutorial is for folk who want to know how to quickly and easily convert all their images to the full HD format for AV or other purposes.

Clearly, such an approach will mean that landscape format photos will be stretched
horizontally. You can, of course, avoid this by cropping each image one by one. Folk who know how to do this will not need this tutorial. However; I have been asked to produce a simple step by step guide, and here it is.

I will be using Faststone Photo Resizer, which can be downloaded for free from here: (Note, This program is only available for Windows Computers)

http://www.faststone.org/FSResizerDetail.htm

• Set up some folders for the project. May I suggest:

• 'HQ Project' – this is overall holding folder, everything is kept here.
• 'hq_jpgs' – this were you copy you high quality jpgs, before any resizing
• 'land' – this were you will copy the landscape format photos
• 'port' – this is were you will copy your portrait format photos
• 'av' – this is were you will copy your resized photos. It will also contain your mp3 sound file, start and end images.

This first example is resize your landscape photos.

1. Convert your raw images and do whatever adjustments or edits you think as required. As you go save them to a suitably named folder, e.g. 'hq_jpgs'. These may include portrait and landscape format at this stage.

2. View your 'hq_jps' folder in thumbnail or large icons view (or whatever view allows you see if they are landscape or portrait).

3. Select all the landscape format images by holding down the Control key [Ctrl], normally at the bottom left of the keyboard. Keep the Ctrl key depressed while you select (click) on all the landscapes.

4. Then release the Ctrl key, the images you have selected should still be highlighted. If not go back and do it again.

5. Now press Ctrl and C. This copies all the images into the computers clipboard.

6. Go to, and open the 'land' folder.

7. Now press Ctrl and V. This will paste all the images into this folder.

8. Now open Faststone Photo Resizer.

9. Navigate to the 'land' folder.

10. This will produce a list of all you landscape format images on a panel on the left of the screen.

11. On the right of the screen there are a number of buttons. Tap 'All All==>'

12. This will make Faststone Photo Resizer, all all these images for processing.

13. At the bottom of this right hand window you will see a button saying 'Output Format'. This should be set to 'JPEG FORMAT (*jpg)

14. To the right of this there is a button called 'Settings', click on this and it will open up a new dialogue box.

15. First settings is 'Quality'. Use the slider to select the quality you wish. There is no need to go for the maximum. '8' is fine, but feel free to play around with this.

16. There is click box, offering 'use jpg from original file if possible'. This should be unchecked.

17. Under this there is a box called, 'Photometric'. This should be set to 'No Change'.

18. Below this there is another box called 'Color Subsampling'. This should be set to 'Disabled (Better Quality).

19. The remaining buttons should read: Smoothing 0, Optimise Huffam – ticked, Progressive – unticked, Keep Exif data – ticked.

20. Now click OK to close this dialogue box.

21. Underneath were is says 'Output Format' is a another box called 'Output Folder'. Click on this and navigate to the folder you set up earlier, called 'AV'.

22. Below this, check to see if the tick box at Advanced settings is on. If not click on it and a new box will appear called 'Advanced Options'. Click on it to open an new dialogue box.

23. This is the powerhouse of this program. At this stage all we are going to use is the resize tab. You will see many others, and with experience you may want to come back and re do your images with a border, a waterline, text footnotes and so on. But resist the temptation!

24. If you cannot see any details in the resize tab click on the small box, within the tab that says. 'resize'.

25. This will now offer you some choices. As all your images are in landscape format, you want to resize in pixels. So click on that button.

26. Now go to <Pick a Standard Size>.

27. From the drop down menu, select '1920x1080' or if you want to future proof your AV, enter 3840x2400.

28. Leave the filter as it is.

29. All other boxes below this must be unticked. This is most important. Now click OK.

30. OK, so you are now back again in the main window for Faststone Photo Resizer and are nearly ready to go.

31. But now check that you correctly identified the folder for ouput. This is were many folk, including myself, make a mistake. You convert the files but can't see them, because you have published them somewhere else. So make sure you have the output set the the av folder, as described at 21 above. (You have been warned!)

32. The program allows you to rename the images. My advice is don't. Keep this tick box unticked. The other two boxes can remain ticked.

33. Ready to go. At the bottom right there is a button with a green triangle for 'Convert'.

34. Click on this and the program will convert all your HQ jpgs to 1920x1080 at 8 quality.

35. Watch as it reduces your 10MB jgs to 600k, 6MB jpgs to 400k.

Now in your 'AV' folder you will find your resized 1920x1080 or (3840x2400) images all ready for your Audio Visual.

Most Audio Visual in full HD works best with landscapes, due to it's wide-screen format. But if you want to add a few portrait format images. You do (almost) exactly the same as above.

1. Convert your raw images and do whatever adjustments or edits you think as required. As you go save them to a suitably named folder, e.g. 'hq_jpgs'. These may include portrait and landscape format at this stage.

2. View your 'hq_jps' folder in thumbnail or large icons view (or whatever view allows you see if they are landscape or portrait).

3. Select all the portrait format images by holding down the Control key [Ctrl], normally at the bottom left of the keyboard. Keep the Ctrl key depressed while you select (click) on all the landscapes.

4. Then release the Ctrl key, the images you have selected should still be highlighted. If not go back and do it again.

5. Now press Ctrl and C. This copies all the images into the computers clipboard.

6. Go to, and open the 'port' folder.

7. Now press Ctrl and V. This will paste all the images into this folder.

8. Now open Faststone Photo Resizer.

9. Navigate to the 'port' folder.

10. This will produce a list of all you landscape format images on a panel on the left of the screen.

11. On the right of the screen there are a number of buttons. Tap 'All All==>'

12. This will make Faststone Photo Resizer, all all these images for processing.

13. At the bottom of this right hand window you will see a button saying 'Output Format'. This should be set to 'JPEG FORMAT (*jpg)

14. To the right of this there is a button called 'Settings', click on this and it will open up a new dialouge box.

15. First settings is 'Quality'. Use the slider to select the quality you wish. There is no need to go for the maximum. '8' is fine, but feel free to play around with this.

16. There is click box, offering 'use jpg from original file if possible'. This should be unchecked.

17. Under this there is a box called, 'Photometric'. This should be set to 'No Change'.

18. Below this there is another box called 'Color Subsampling'. This should be set to 'Disabled (Better Quality).

19. The remaining buttons should read: Smoothing 0, Optimise Huffam – ticked, Progressive – unticked, Keep Exif data – ticked.

20. Now click OK to close this dialogue box.

21. Underneath were is says 'Output Format' is a another box called 'Output Folder'. Click on this and navigate to the folder you set up earlier, called 'AV'.

22. Below this, check to see if the tick box at Advanced settings is on. If not click on it and a new box will appear called 'Advanced Options'. Click on it to open an new dialogue box.

23. This is the powerhouse of this program. At this stage all we are going to use is the resize tab. You will see many others, and with experience you may want to come back and re do your images with a border, a waterline, text footnotes and so on. But resist the temptation!

24. If you cannot see any details in the resize tab click on the small box, within the tab that says. 'resize'.

25. This will now offer you some choices. As all your images are in portrait format, you want to resize based on one side. So click on that button and go to 'Prefined side' and select height.

26. Now type in the height of 1080 to the exactly box. Or 1200 for 16:10, or 2400 for future proofing.

27. OK, so you are now back again in the main window for Faststone Photo Resizer and are nearly ready to go.

28. But now check that you correctly identified the folder for output. This is were many folk, including myself, make a mistake. You convert the files but can't see them, because you have published them somewhere else. So make sure you have the output set the the av folder, as described at 21 above. (You have been warned!)

29. The program allows you to rename the images. My advice is don't. Keep this tick box un-ticked. The other two boxes can remain ticked.

30. Ready to go. At the bottom right there is a button with a green triangle for 'Convert'.

31. Click on this and the program will convert all your HQ jpgs at 8 quality.

32. Watch as it reduces your 10MB jgs to 600k, 6MB jpgs to 400k.

33. Now in your 'AV' folder you will find your resized 1920x1080 images already for your Audio Visual.

Please note that while the approach for landscapes will make all your images the same size for viewing on screen (1920x1080, or 1980x1200 or 3840x2400) – it doesn't work for portraits. All your portraits will be now be 1080, 1200 or 2400 pixels tall, but they may be of different widths.

As mentioned at the start of this tutorial, this is for folk who want to know how to resize all their images at one go. Clearly; more advanced users will want to handle their images one by one.

[Updated, to include the increasing use of 16:10 (rather than 16:9) and how to future proof your AV's by resizing to 3840x2400 (instead of 1920x1200).

A printable PDF version of this tutorial is available here. 

I hope this helps almark.net@gmail.com